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Authorities: Why the families of Ethiopian plane crash victims may never be able to bury their loved ones

    A Boeing 737 MAX 8 is pictured outside the company’s factory on March 11, 2019 in Renton, Washington. [Credit/AFP]

THE PAIN of families of those who died in the Ethiopian Airlines plane crash last Sunday appears to have been compounded further following reports that it will be difficult to match remains to DNA samples.

By G. Daniel

According to government authorities that have been involved in the recovery of bodies since the crash was reportd, it could take months for DNA experts to match the body parts recovered from the crash scene to DNA samples to be provided by the relatives of the victims.

By Tuesday, the Ethiopian government was reported to have remained tight on information on the recovery process.

Kenyan Transport PS Esther Koimett and other senior government officials are said to have left Addis Ababa back to Nairobi on Tuesday evening when it became evident hat there is no end in sight into investigations into the crash.

The plane crash left all the 157 people on board dead, the second fatal accident by a Boeing 737 Max 8 plane model in five months time.

United Kingdom Civil Aviation Authority on Tuesday joined Ethiopia, Malaysia, Singapore, China and Australia in banning the use of the aircraft terming the ban as a ‘precautionary measure’.

US federal aviation officials have, however, said that the 737 Max 8 is airworthy and that it is too early to reach any conclusions or take any action.

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